Time and Tide Photo

Good photography is about timing and patience waiting for the perfect lighting or the clouds to be just so, something that Time and Tide Photo does well. Time and Tide Photo was created by a husband and wife team of Emily and Jayson. Emily has always had a love of doing crafts and has dabbled in painting, and ceramics, besides photography. She has been doing photography on and off for about 12 years and first got introduced to film photography in high school. She started doing digital photography after taking a class in college. Jayson has just recently, in the last year gotten into doing photography. Friends, family and coworkers have asked to buy photos and suggested that they sell them. So they decided to give it a try.

Influenced by Ansel Adams’ photography, their subjects are often landscapes. They also like to keep up with current photographers on Digital Photography School.

Our photos are created because we love to take photos. In every photo we take, we enjoy the subject or place, the composition and the lighting. We do not take photos because we think that they will sell or make money, we do it out of passion and instinct. We think that the positive energy, creativeness and passion shows through in the final products. People should buy from us because they are supporting local artists, and because they are getting a unique piece of art. Larger retailers create mass produced products purely for profit.

When not working on their photos, Jayson works full time in banking and Emily is a full time Mommy and also works part time in retail. You can get more information from their blog and you can view Emily’s Flickr stream and Jayson’s Flickr stream for more great photos.

  • Handknit Hugs
  • Fiber Jewelry by Susan Sanders
  • Spring Organization: Workspaces
  • Rainbow Crochet Toasties
  • Twirly Fabulous Upcycled Sweater Skirts
  • Crescent Maille
  • A pincushion for every day
  • language & meaning designworks

A Lovely Bunch

No tree is more indicative of the tropics than the coconut palm. Flourishing in warm climates as far away as Polynesia and as close to home as Southern California, coconut palms have been around since the dinosaurs roamed the earth. I don’t know what T-rex did with them back then, but today they are used for everything from food to decoration. In fact, virtually every part of the coconut palm can be made use of. The roots, trunk and fronds are used for many things, including shelter and furniture, but it’s the sacred fruit and its hard shell that have been most-prized by humans and beasts alike.

pinkorangecoconut

Perhaps the prettiest use of the coconut shell that I’ve seen are these whimsical, cute-as-a-button earrings and necklace by Emm’s Gems (above). Lightweight, colourful and eco-friendly, Emily’s coconut button and bead pieces bring a touch of the tropics to your jewelry collection – no matter how far you are from the tall, swaying palms themselves.

[Read more…]

  • Handknit Hugs
  • Fiber Jewelry by Susan Sanders
  • Spring Organization: Workspaces
  • Rainbow Crochet Toasties
  • Twirly Fabulous Upcycled Sweater Skirts
  • Crescent Maille
  • A pincushion for every day
  • language & meaning designworks

What’s In Season Now: May

Raspberry Farmer's Market Letterpress Poster

We interrupt this program to bring you the customary May Edition of ‘What’s In Season Now’. Many of the recommendations made in both the March and April editions are still applicable; if you missed it before, be sure to check those out now!

Last night I baked a Strawberry-Rhubarb Pie. It was delicious both in that it tasted like heaven and that it’s a sure sign, even here in the land of never-ending winters, the season of fresh harvested bounty is upon us.

While the rhubarb was harvested just a couple hundred feet from my front door, the strawberries were not local. Had we not already devoured all of those I’d frozen last summer they could have been, but alas we had. And as unfortunate as it is, strawberries and rhubarb have yet to get the memo that they should ripen at the same time — what with them being so very complementary to one another when coated in honey, sprinkled with cinnamon and baked into a flaky crust — and my children have yet to get the memo that frozen strawberries are supposed to last us until the following strawberry season.

The uncooperative nature of strawberries and rhubarb aside, May is probably one of the most diverse months of the early growing season in the Northern Hemisphere. As the climate in the north just begins to warm to true growing temperatures, in the southern and more temperate locales summer’s gifts are making their first appearances at Farmer’s Markets.

Those strawberries I won’t be able to source locally for another month are already gracing farm stands in some places, for instance. And don’t be fooled by their smaller stature when compared to their supermarket cousins. In every one of those small berries is ten-times the flavor — and one-hundred times the ethical ego-boost.

Beside them early blueberries are making appearances as citrus fruits close-up shop; garbanzo beans — while a lot of prep work — and fava beans also start showing up in their fresh, rather than dried form. Greens of all kinds are still in their glory in many places and can inspire myriad dishes when you get creative by serving them sautéed, steamed and even raw in all their forms; collard and chard are delicious drizzled with a favorite vinegar. Radishes, like asparagus, may be winding down in warmer areas, but in the cooler north they’re producing at peak; and make an excellent addition to salads and atop crostini with dinner. Likewise peas are a raw treat for kids and adults alike and later in the month even cherries will start to make an appearance some places.

Vintage Recipe Cards by Alice's Looking Glass on Etsy

What are you seeing at the Farmer’s Market this month? And even better, what are you doing with it? Share your favorite May finds, tips, tricks and recipes in the comments below and I’ll feature the best of the best later this month in a column!

And just one last note before I leave you to your shopping: Not sure where to find a farmer’s market near you? Check out Local Harvest for help. Not sure how to shop a farmer’s market? Never been before? Check out the farmer’s market guide that was featured right here at Try Handmade last year for tips!

  • Handknit Hugs
  • Fiber Jewelry by Susan Sanders
  • Spring Organization: Workspaces
  • Rainbow Crochet Toasties
  • Twirly Fabulous Upcycled Sweater Skirts
  • Crescent Maille
  • A pincushion for every day
  • language & meaning designworks

Life Squared Necklaces by Julian & Co

lsquared

I’m completely besotted with these little cube necklaces from Julian & Co. I love the idea of the necklace, the simple design of a “die” inscribed with the important dates and people in your life.

But what takes this above and beyond for me, is the fact that it’s not just a pretty piece of jewelry. It’s also a wax seal press. Yep, you heard me. Each necklace comes with sealing wax which you can then stamp with your necklace to make a lasting impression.

lsquared2

Do I find myself sealing a lot of letters with wax? Well, no, not at present. But I love the idea of sealing letters with wax. Writing more letters to friends and family is on my resolutions list for the new year. My husband called me a geek for getting so excited about a necklace that was also a wax seal but so be it! I love fountain pens too! And good old fashioned mail and sentimental jewelry. Here we have the perfect nexus of a few of my favorite things.

I think this clever necklace would make a spectacular & thoughtful holiday gift for a lucky recipient.

  • Handknit Hugs
  • Fiber Jewelry by Susan Sanders
  • Spring Organization: Workspaces
  • Rainbow Crochet Toasties
  • Twirly Fabulous Upcycled Sweater Skirts
  • Crescent Maille
  • A pincushion for every day
  • language & meaning designworks

Back-to-School Eats: Brown Bag Lunch Edition

This week, in the Back-to-School Eats series, I’m going to talk Brown Bag Lunches. From planning to execution, purchase to lunchroom-feast I’ve got tips, tricks and ideas to make healthy, mostly local lunches quick, easy and attainable for even the busiest families. But before we get started on lunch, if you haven’t already, be sure to check out the Back-to-School Eats: On The Go Breakfast Edition for four wholesome ways to kick off your school-kid’s day. Because breakfast is the most important meal, one that sets the tone for success and health and if your child hasn’t had a good breakfast the quality of his lunch isn’t going to be able to make up the difference.

Have a System – When my oldest started Kindergarten I was still one of those really good parents. I was expending an obnoxious amount of time trying to Do It All and I was succeeding. Most of the remnants of that time are now long gone, ancient history, but a few usable bits and pieces still remain. One of those things is a lunch planning spreadsheet I created. Or, rather, several of them. They’re divided into four categories; main dish, fruit, vegetable and treat. Those categories are color coded and each spreadsheet represents a different season, a different part of the school year. In each of the categories, on each of the spreadsheets, are several items that we usually have on hand during that time of year. Some items make an appearance in more than one season — peanut butter and jam sandwiches and apples, for instance — but many are seasonal with temporary availability — like asparagus in the springtime, peaches and pears in the late summer and early fall. Each day my girls pick one item from each category to make up the lunch of their choice. You don’t have to use my system, though it works very well if you’d like to, but have a system in place to make everything from purchase to packing easy.

Start Big – It’s contrary to everything your mother ever told you — “Start small, deary! Work your way up! — but hear me out. What I mean is not to start big overall, but to start with the big things. To have the biggest impact start with the largest portions of the meal and work your way down to the condiments, the toppings, the little treats. If sandwiches are a common component of your kids’ lunch look for good local sources of bread (or the grains to make it in your very own bread maker) and lunch meat. Worry about the condiments later, for instance.

Understand Your Law of Supply and Demand – And obey it. If you have one child who eats an apple a day, chances are you don’t need a bushel of apples every week. It’s just as easy to overdo it at the Farmer’s Market as it is to not go at all. Buy what you need, eat what you buy.

Plan Ahead – Unless you’re fortunate enough to be in a temperate climate where the growing season and the Farmer’s Market go year-round, you’re going to have to plan ahead for winter. Last year, in On Year Round Appreciation, I alluded to the importance of asking your local growers about year-round product availability now, before the market closes, but that is doubly important when you’re trying to get three meals a day out of the local food scene. Remember, some products don’t have a set season. Meats, eggs, preserves, breads, and even some produce that keeps well in a root cellar like potatoes, onions, apples, hard squashes and garlic can be had in the dead of winter without trucking it in from miles out. Start planning how you’ll access these goods before the cold sets in. You may be able to buy them farm direct, you may need to stock up. Now is the time to know which it’ll be.

Whatever the system you choose and foods you pack here’s to happy, healthy, local and — most important — stress-free back-to-school lunches!

Column art all via Flickr’s Creative Commons; courtesy of Back Garage, SweetOnVeg and Public Domain Photos, respectively.

  • Handknit Hugs
  • Fiber Jewelry by Susan Sanders
  • Spring Organization: Workspaces
  • Rainbow Crochet Toasties
  • Twirly Fabulous Upcycled Sweater Skirts
  • Crescent Maille
  • A pincushion for every day
  • language & meaning designworks