Jewelly Baubles so pretty pretty

One for each finger, my dears. That’s sage advice from me to you.

Tres Artsy bio: I am a mostly self taught, artistically inclined sort, cursed with an inability to sit still. Therefore, I’m compelled to create, create, and re-create.

The items in my store are entirely hand crafted by my busy fingers. I use vintage / recycled / rehabilitated materials when possible.

  • Handknit Hugs
  • Twirly Fabulous Upcycled Sweater Skirts
  • Hissyfit
  • Aisles and aisles of tiny boxes
  • Fiber Jewelry by Susan Sanders
  • Spring Organization: Workspaces
  • Hiné Camera Camera Cases
  • me me me

An Egg of a Different Color

I imagine the supermarket sales of white eggs soars this time of year. Soar may be a strong word, but I can’t imagine the increase is insignificant in any way. I’ve known even those with their own backyard chicken flocks to lament the need for supporting the corporate, commercial egg giants around Easter. I’ve overheard regular local shoppers, small farm subscribers even, who routinely add a dozen supermarket eggs to their shopping ritual just before the spring holiday, in fact.

Why? Because you can’t dye brown eggs.

Our Grandmothers would be rolling over that last statement. Absolutely rolling with laughter.

Of course you can dye brown eggs. Not only can you, you can do so with all natural dyes. And the result is stunning. Simply stunning. But somewhere, at some time, in the past fifty years or so that fact has been lost on America’s masses. Somewhere, at some time, in the past fifty years or so we’ve been conditioned to believe only the brightest, whitest, factory washed eggs are suitable for the spring-time ritual of dying eggs. And because of it, we’ve been missing out.

So gather your local farm fresh eggs, brown shells and all, boil them up, stack them in a bowl in the center of the table and summons the children — and children at heart. You’re about to make the most beautiful Easter eggs you’ve ever seen.

All you need is a couple of small stock pots, a little water, a splash of vinegar and whatever dying materials you can muster up. Beets make a striking red dye, while blueberries and their juice make the most vibrant blue I’ve ever seen and turmeric — such as the organic ground you can buy on Etsy, pictured above — makes an amazing deep, golden rod yellow.

Tip: Remember, keep it simple. From just the three primary colors your dying options are endless. No need to make countless dyes. Get creative and layer colors instead.

But you needn’t stop there. Onion skins, wine, coffee and tea grounds, and so much more can make excellent dyes. Use your imagination and what you have on hand.

Once you’ve chosen the items you’ll use to make dye. Add each to a small stock pot all its own, one at a time. Cover with water and bring to a boil. Maintain at a boil until dye reaches your desired depth and vibrancy. Strain into a coffee cup and add a splash of vinegar to help the dye adhere to the egg shell.

The dye will be, literally, boiling hot so if children are helping it’s best to let it cool slightly before using. Otherwise, you’re ready to begin.

Tip: Be patient. Natural dyes take a little longer than store-bought kits. The longer you leave the egg in the dye bath, the more intense the final color will be.

  • Handknit Hugs
  • Twirly Fabulous Upcycled Sweater Skirts
  • Hissyfit
  • Aisles and aisles of tiny boxes
  • Fiber Jewelry by Susan Sanders
  • Spring Organization: Workspaces
  • Hiné Camera Camera Cases
  • me me me

Chilli Crab

My favorite thing about the Try Handmade Gallery is that I know that every day I will be surprised by something wonderful. A perfect example is Chilli Crab. What wonderful intricate creations.

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Chilli Crab: i am a german expat happily living in singapore with my husband and two sons. i really enjoy the freedom of being engaged with the things that i have been doing for more than 6 years now.

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the biggest influence on me becoming a creative person definitely comes from my parents and my mother-in-law. my mother loved to do any kind of handcrafts, from knitting, crocheting to silk painting and sewing. she did everything. my father is talented with any kind of woodwork. and my mother-in-law is a great painter and artist in general.

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but the decision to keep my fingers busy with other things than typing the keyboard in a software company came during my first pregnancy. i felt almost forced to create crochet treasures and made a lot of gifts for friends and family. after that my interest evolved into designing home accessories. later i got interested in creating jewelry. nowadays, i still maintain my interests in all these areas.

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  • Handknit Hugs
  • Twirly Fabulous Upcycled Sweater Skirts
  • Hissyfit
  • Aisles and aisles of tiny boxes
  • Fiber Jewelry by Susan Sanders
  • Spring Organization: Workspaces
  • Hiné Camera Camera Cases
  • me me me

Metal origami jewelry

You look at this necklace and think it is fabric, right? Read on.

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Wendy Hacker-Moss: Over 200 large stainless steel florets are handfolded origami style and attached to a sterling silver chain. 4 mm blue fresh water pearls are set in the center of the florets.

In the process of creating, each flower is tended to carefully, worked and shaped by hand, and then securely attached to either a sterling silver hand-woven, linked or chain-mail base structure. Attachment is not haphazard or random, but rather repetitive and exacting with a gestalt sensibility, so as to create thickets of form from material. The process is meditative and prayer-like in nature.

Imbued with meaning, objects may carry history from one generation to the next–just as jewelry passed from parent to child may transmit history from one generation to the next. My intention is to create a lasting representation of that which in nature is fleeting. For me, this is a way to memorialize the ephemeral in a sturdy form.

  • Handknit Hugs
  • Twirly Fabulous Upcycled Sweater Skirts
  • Hissyfit
  • Aisles and aisles of tiny boxes
  • Fiber Jewelry by Susan Sanders
  • Spring Organization: Workspaces
  • Hiné Camera Camera Cases
  • me me me